Lenny Pozner Founded HONR Network to Protect Victims of High Profile Tragedies

Veronique and Lenny Pozner are the parents of Noah Pozner, one of the 20 children killed in the December 14, 2012, Sandy Hook massacre. Mr. Lenny Pozner founded the HONR Network, aimed at combating conspiracy theorists on mass shootings.

Stopping the Continual and Intentional Torment of Victims –

After suffering the agonizing emotional pain of the loss of a loved one to violence, grieving family members are forced to endure emotional stress in the form of hostile confrontation, online slander and defamation, and disparagement of the memory of their loved one, as well as the denigration of the tribulation they have experienced as a result of the death of their loved one. No one should have to endure such hateful treatment at the hands of fellow members of society, especially after suffering profound loss to an unspeakable act of violence.

The HONR Network believes that decent society should not tolerate those who exploit tragedies and prey on the victims of violent crimes as in the case of Veronique and Lenny Pozner. Americans who’ve lost their loved ones should be allowed to grieve in peace without being harassed, exploited or subjected to online defamation. Unfortunately, the publicity surrounding most high-profile tragedies makes these vulnerable people ideal targets for this kind of persecution

 

We Take Action Against the Abusers –

Most members of society are allowed to grieve in peace, surrounded by an atmosphere of compassion. This has not been the case for many family members of victims who lost their lives to tragic, highly publicized mass killings. It isn’t fair or acceptable. Action must be taken to restore peace and tranquility to those personally affected by the despicable cruelty cast upon them by individuals acting under the ‘truth movement.’ As a society, the right to free speech is important to all of us, but there is a fine line between freedom of speech and freedom to abuse and defame others. The Hoaxers and Gun Truthers are regularly crossing that line, and must not be allowed to impart this sort of hatred unimpeded. Until these malicious abusers anonymous identities are revealed and they are burdened by consequences, they will not stop stalking and tormenting innocent people who are trying to go on with their lives and heal from the emotional trauma suffered as a result of their tragic loss.

 

We’re In This Together –

Most of us remember where we were, and the profound sadness we felt when we heard about each of the horrific tragedies that unfolded in recent years. Our sadness was for the victims who lost their lives, and for the families left to suffer unimaginable emotional pain for the rest of theirs. Grief is a painful process to go through, but it is a natural and necessary one in healing.

Families in grief have the right to do so in peace and dignity. Regrettably, victims’ families are being cheated out of this basic human dignity, and being subjected to unspeakable harassment on an ongoing basis. We need to band together as a community of caring individuals, and act to stop these abusers from inflicting any further harm to people who have committed no crime, and simply want to be left alone to grieve their loved ones and live out the rest of their lives in peace.
Also read: Sandy Hook Dad (Lenny Pozner) Fights back Against ‘Hoaxers’

Sandy Hook Dad (Lenny Pozner) Fights back Against ‘Hoaxers’ with Lawsuit and Hilarious Trump Pranks

The father of the youngest child slain at Sandy Hook Elementary School Lenny Pozner is fighting back against conspiracy theorists who believe the massacre never happened.

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Lenny Pozner used to be conspiracy theorist himself before his 6-year-old son, Noah, had his jaw blown off Dec. 14, 2012, by a gunman’s AR-15 inside his first grade classroom.

 

In fact, Pozner told New York Magazine, he might even have listened to conspiracy-monger Alex Jones’ podcast the morning he dropped off Noah and his two daughters at school for the last time.

 

But, after his son died along with 19 other children and six adults, he realized the harm in speculating without much evidence about real-life events.

 

“Conspiracy theorists erase the human aspect of history,” Pozner told the magazine. “My child — who lived, who was a real person — is basically going to be erased.”

 

Pozner first tried proving “truthers” — whom he prefers to call “hoaxers” — wrong by supplying documents and other evidence to show Noah had existed and was murdered, but he found too many of them had no interest in engaging with facts.

 

“There was a segment of the population that wanted to have these things debunked,” Pozner said. “All they know is what they’re seeing online, the buzz of all of this dis­information, and someone needed to provide the service of offering accurate information should they want it.”

 

So he called out some of the most prominent hoaxers, including Wolfgang Halbig and former Florida Atlantic University professor James Tracy, by name and set up the Conspiracy Theorists Anonymous to help debunk their conspiracy theories.

 

But Pozner realized after about a year — as hoaxers launched personal attacks against him and other group members — that debunking had run its course.

 

“I realized there was no one left with questions,” he said. “The only people left were trolls.”

 

The former IT consultant spends much of his days filing copyright complaints against hoaxers who use photos of his family, and he founded the HONR Network last year to help remove conspiracy theory content about the Sandy Hook shootings.

 

Pozner worries that Halbig and other hoaxers inspire “crazies” to engage in possible violence against Sandy Hook victims’ families — who they believe are imposters involved in a government plot to disarm Americans.

 

So he has decided to fight back against them through goofy pranks, targeted complaints and a lawsuit against Halbig for invasion of privacy.

 

“Suing Halbig is symbolic,” Pozner told New York Magazine. “If I can show that if you go after a victim, a victim is gonna sue you — that’s real.”

 

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Lenny Pozner used to believe in conspiracy theories. Until his son’s death became one.

On December 14, 2012, Lenny Pozner dropped off his three children, Sophia, Arielle, and Noah, at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. Noah had recently turned 6, and on the drive over they listened to his favorite song, “Gangnam Style,” for what turned out to be the last time. Half an hour later, while Sophia and Arielle hid nearby, Adam Lanza walked into Noah’s first-grade class with an AR-15 rifle. Noah was the youngest of the 20 children and seven adults killed in one of the deadliest shootings in American history. When the medical examiner found Noah lying face up in a Batman sweatshirt, his jaw had been blown off. Lenny and his wife, Veronique, raced to the school as soon as they heard the news, but had to wait for hours alongside other parents to learn their son’s fate

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It didn’t take much longer for Pozner to find out that many people didn’t believe his son had died or even that he had lived at all. Days after the rampage, a man walked around Newtown filming a video in which he declared that the massacre had been staged by “some sort of New World Order global elitists” intent on taking away our guns and our liberty. A week later, James Tracy, a professor at Florida Atlantic University, wrote a blog post expressing doubts about the massacre. By January, a 30-minute YouTube video, titled “The Sandy Hook Shooting — Fully Exposed,” which asked questions like “Wouldn’t frantic kids be a difficult target to hit?,” had been viewed more than 10 million times.

 

As the families grieved, conspiracy theorists began to press their case in ways that Newtown couldn’t avoid. State officials received anonymous phone calls at their homes, late at night, demanding answers: Why were there no trauma helicopters? What happened to the initial reports of a second shooter? A Virginia man stole playground signs memorializing two of the victims, and then called their parents to say that the burglary shouldn’t affect them, since their children had never existed. At one point, Lenny Pozner was checking into a hotel out of town when the clerk looked up from the address on his driver’s license and said, “Oh, Sandy Hook — the government did that.” Pozner had tried his best to ignore the conspiracies, but eventually they disrupted his grieving process so much that he could no longer turn a blind eye. “Conspiracy theorists erase the human aspect of history,” Pozner said this summer. “My child — who lived, who was a real person — is basically going to be erased.”

 

The Pozners moved to Newtown in 2005, partly to send their kids to better schools, but after Noah’s death they saw no choice but to leave. “What happened just weighed on the town like a Chernobyl-like cloud,” Veronique told me from her home in a state far from Newtown that the Pozners prefer not to identify, given the threats that conspiracy theorists have leveled against some Sandy Hook families. The Pozners’ marriage had been falling apart before the shooting, and though Noah’s death briefly brought them back together, the couple eventually divorced. They still co-parent their daughters, who developed a fear of the dark after the shooting and asked Veronique to find a home in a gated community.

 

Lenny, who has a goatee and a middle-aged paunch, lives by himself a few miles from Veronique. Since relocating, he has moved apartments four times and gets his mail delivered to a P.O. box on the other side of the state. “It’s part of what I need to do to stay vigilant,” he said. After eight months in his newest home, the living room was sparsely furnished, save for a painting of Noah and a cluttered coffee table topped with his daughters’ Barbie dolls and a book called The Meaning of Life.

 

“I prefer the term hoaxer to truther,” Lenny said, kicking a pair of jeans and Adidas flip-flops onto the footrest of leather Barcalounger. “There’s nothing truthful about it.” There is no universal Sandy Hook hoax narrative, but the theories generally center on the idea that a powerful force (the Obama administration, gun-control groups, the Illuminati) staged the shooting, with the assistance of paid “crisis actors,” including the Pozners, the other Sandy Hook families, and countless Newtown residents, government officials, and media outlets. The children are said to have never existed or to be living in an elaborate witness-­protection program.

 

Conspiracy theories run deep in the American consciousness — 61 percent of Americans believe Lee Harvey Oswald didn’t act alone — but a mass shooting had never drawn the conspiratorial attention that Sandy Hook did. The modern internet is partly to blame, with hours of uploaded cable-news coverage and reams of documents to parse for circumstantial evidence.

 

The internet also made it easier to reach victims, and the Pozners became an early target for hoaxers. Veronique, who is a nurse, joined several parents in channeling her grief into vocal gun-control advocacy. One early conspiracy theory held that she was actually a Swiss diplomat named Veronique Haller, who once attended a United Nations arms-control summit. (Veronique is Swiss, and her maiden name is Haller.) Hoaxers quickly scoured family photos on Veronique’s online accounts and began dissecting them for odd shadows or strange poses, suggesting that she had been inserted into the family via Photoshop.

 

Lenny may have been the first Newtown parent to discover that conspiracy theorists didn’t believe his son had been killed, because he used to be a serious conspiracy theorist himself. “I probably listened to an Alex Jones podcast after I dropped the kids off at school that morning,” Pozner said, referencing the fearmongering proprietor of InfoWars. Pozner had entertained everything from specific cover-ups (the moon landing was faked) to geopolitical intrigue (the “real” reasons why the price of gold sometimes shifted so dramatically) and saw value in skepticism. But for him, the appeal of conspiracy theories was the same as watching a good science-fiction movie. “I have an imaginative mind,” he said.

 

When he first discovered the theories about Noah, Lenny, who grew up in Brooklyn, made only a halfhearted attempt to respond. “I feel that your type of show created these hateful people,” Pozner wrote in an email to Alex Jones, to which one of Jones’s employees replied that Jones would love to speak to him if “we confirm that you are the real Lenny Pozner.” Pozner declined, in part because he found himself unable to do much of anything.

 

Read full story here at: http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2016/09/the-sandy-hook-hoax.html